12. Exercise (Hospital and Me and BPD)

It’s another occupational therapy post, everyone! I actually wasn’t expecting to write so much about OT, I think this blogging challenge has helped me view my time on Stanage more clearly, and sort through what were the most important parts of it for me. Turns out, OT was a big one. And it’s unsurprising that since I came out of hospital, these are the kinds of activities that have continued to help me feel better. I guess even writing these posts is a type of occupational therapy, as it’s keeping me busy and I find it quite therapeutic to write about everything that’s happened. In my free time at the moment I also enjoy crochet, knitting, drawing and painting. Hang on, that sounds like the rubbish ‘about me’ bit of a dating profile. Or a CV.

Anyway, some of the best OT activities on Stanage were the ones based around exercise, perhaps because there was something like this pretty much every day. There were two gym sessions a week, on Monday and Thursday, where we could leave the locked ward to go down to the OT gym. It was pretty basic but had everything to keep you busy for an hour or so’s workout. Treadmill, stationary bike, rowing machine (one of my favourites) (yes, really), and various assisted weight machines. 

The occupational therapists who supported us there were amazing too. Like Terry in the pottery sessions, they were encouraging without forcing us to do anything we didn’t feel comfortable with. They helped us develop exercise plans, set realistic goals and try new things. I remember having a really good chat with one of them about parkrun (see my other blog, Running For My Life, about my love of running), what our best times were, and which were our favourite courses to run in Sheffield. Like the creative OT activities, this was another thing that tapped into my sense of self and reminded me that I was more than just my mental ill health.

The Cardio Wall in the OT gym.

My favourite part of the gym was a piece of equipment called the Cardio Wall, a bank of flashing lights which you punched with spherical handheld weights. You could program the wall for different timed sequences that tested your speed and reflexes. Next to the wall was a white board where we could write our best scores for each sequence, encouraging us to beat each other and our own previous times. It was a great incentive and I’d love to have another go on one. Ideally one not in a psychiatric ward gym, though.

I still find getting active useful for my recovery and think it will always be a key part of how I maintain my mental health.

Sarah x 

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